TBR honors Richard B. Ray, Blount Memorial Hospital for support of higher education 

Richard Ray at lectern, accepting Regents' Award on Aug. 17, 2021
Richard B. Ray of Knoxville, a co-founder of tnAchieves, accepts the Regents’ Award for Excellence in Philanthropy at Pellissippi State on Aug. 17.

Richard B. Ray of Knoxville, a co-founder of tnAchieves, and Blount Memorial Hospital were honored this month by the Tennessee Board of Regents for their longstanding support of education. Both were nominated by Pellissippi State Community College President L. Anthony Wise Jr. 

Ray received the 2021 Regents’ Award for Excellence in Philanthropy at a Ribbon Cutting Celebration for Pellissippi State’s Bill Haslam Center for Math and Science on Aug. 17, while Blount Memorial’s chief executive officer Don Heinemann and board vice chair David Pesterfield accepted the 2021 Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Philanthropy at a Blount Partnership event Aug. 25. 

Established in 2001, these awards honor individuals, companies and organizations who go “above and beyond” to donate their resources, finances, and personal time to TBR’s 40 community and technical colleges. 

Wise nominated Ray, co-founder and chief financial officer of 21st Mortgage Corporation, for his commitment to tnAchieves, the college scholarship and mentorship program that pairs volunteer mentors with incoming college students who receive the Tennessee Promise scholarship.  

Not only did Ray found KnoxAchieves, the precursor to tnAchieves, with fellow Knoxville businessmen Randy Boyd, Bill Haslam, Mike Ragsdale and Tim Williams in 2009, but Ray is one of only four tnAchieves volunteers across the state who has served as a mentor every single year. Over the past 12 years, Ray has mentored over 60 students. He drives from his home in west Knoxville to the Carter community in east Knox County to meet with his mentees, and he volunteers every year to teach budgeting at tnAchieves’ Summer Bridge Program at Pellissippi State, which helps incoming students start on a more college-ready level, both academically and socially. 

“Rich Ray was the first in his family to graduate from college,” Wise writes in nominating Ray for the award. “Growing up in east Knoxville, Rich worked his way through the University of Tennessee. He remembers the challenges of working to pay tuition and navigating higher education without a mentor to guide him. Rich says, ‘If you are the first in family to ever go beyond high school, you need someone to tell you it is possible, that you can do it.’” 

Ray and his wife, Jane, also have supported Pellissippi State since 2017, with gifts to the Student Opportunity Fund, which helps the Pellissippi State Foundation assist students in crisis, and to support the expansion of the Strawberry Plains Campus library. The couple also has committed a planned gift to Pellissippi State to continue their support of community college students into the future. 

“Jane and I have been fortunate to contribute to wonderful organizations, but we do focus on education,” Ray said when accepting the award from Regent Danni B. Varlan on Aug. 17. “We firmly believe that to have a better quality of life for our kids in Tennessee, they must be better educated. That begins with K-3 and continues all the way through getting their degrees either at a university or a community college or developing a trade at TCAT, so thank you for this recognition. I appreciate it.” 

Blount Memorial Hospital chief executive officer Don Heinemann, second from left, and hospital board vice chair David Pesterfield, third from left, accept the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Philanthropy on Aug. 25, 2021
Blount Memorial Hospital chief executive officer Don Heinemann, second from left, and hospital board vice chair David Pesterfield, third from left, accept the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Philanthropy on Aug. 25, from Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr., left, and Regent Danni B. Varlan.

Wise nominated Blount Memorial Hospital for the Chancellor’s Award for its longstanding support of Pellissippi State students. In 2001 the hospital established the Blount Memorial Nursing Scholarship, which is awarded annually to a Nursing student from Blount County. The hospital later funded the Nursing simulation lab at the college’s Blount County Campus, helping establish the college’s Nursing program in 2010. More recently Blount Memorial pledged $100,000 to help build the Ruth and Steve West Workforce Development Center on the Blount County Campus, which is now underway and is scheduled for completion in 2022. 

While Blount Memorial sponsors clinical rotations for Pellissippi State’s Nursing students, last year Pellissippi State helped the hospital train 61 of its medical-surgical nurses in COVID-19 patient care, allowing the hospital to use the Nursing simulation lab on the Blount County Campus to practice scenarios based on actual COVID-19 cases. These COVID-19 trainings were just the beginning of what Pellissippi State and Blount Memorial envision being a year-round partnership, including the possibility of launching a nurse residency program. 

Blount Memorial’s support of Blount County and its people, however, dates to its founding in 1947, when local physicians and philanthropists partnered with ALCOA Inc. to realize the dream of a community hospital. 

“Blount Memorial Hospital is committed to care for the health and well-being of any individual who needs assistance, regardless of their ability to pay,” Wise writes in nominating Blount Memorial for the award. “This ethos permeates the organizational culture, from the greeter at the welcome desk to the most skilled surgeon. As healthcare challenges increase, so does Blount Memorial’s commitment to care for all who need assistance: every child, every senior, every hurting or sick individual, regardless of circumstance.” 

 “It’s truly an honor for Blount Memorial to receive the Chancellor’s Award,” said Heinemann, the hospital’s CEO. “Our work with Pellissippi State is something we’ve cherished over the years, and we’re committed to continuing our efforts to support Pellissippi State students who are planning careers in health care. As we saw just in the last year, our collaboration with Pellissippi State helped us ensure our team was prepared to handle the influx of COVID-19 cases in our community. In a pandemic – or any other time – that’s a win-win for us.” 

Fall classes are now underway at Pellissippi State. For more information about the college or the Foundation, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400. 

To apply to be a tnAchieves mentor for the Class of 2022, a commitment of about one hour per month, visit www.tnachieves.org/mentors 

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Apply by July 31 to start Pellissippi State’s Nursing program in January

A group of nursing students stand in lab holding IV tubes
Pellissippi State Nursing students learn how to hang IV fluids in a skills lab at the college’s Strawberry Plains Campus in January 2020.

Nurses were, without a doubt, one of the breakout heroes of the COVID-19 pandemic. Do you have what it takes to be a hero? 

Pellissippi State Community College has started a spring Nursing cohort that begins January 2022. The program is offered on the college’s Blount County, Magnolia Avenue and Strawberry Plains campuses. 

Applications are due July 31. You can find the steps to apply at www.pstcc.edu/nursing/apply. 

No previous medical experience is required, although the college offers a separate Bridge program that allows Licensed Practical Nurses and paramedics to “bridge” to Registered Nurse. 

By creating a spring cohort that begins in January, Pellissippi State can offer the same quality Nursing program to an additional 50 students. Applicants may indicate their preferred campus. 

Those Nursing students who begin in January 2022 can expect to graduate in December 2023. The 22-month program is primarily Nursing classes, with eight general education courses required. Students complete clinicals each semester of the program as well. 

After graduation, students sit for the NCLEX-RN exam, which each nurse in the United States and Canada must pass to become a registered nurse. All 70 of Pellissippi State’s spring 2020 Nursing graduates passed their national licensing exam on their first attempt, the first time the college has achieved a 100% pass rate since the Nursing program started in 2011. 

“Most Nursing students, I’d say 98 or 99%, have secured a job prior to graduating,” said Dean of Nursing Angela Lunsford. “We have hospitals calling us all the time to recruit. They need people.” 

Criteria used to assess candidates are: 

  • Overall GPA in required general education courses (minimum 2.5 GPA)  
  • HESI A2 nursing entrance exam scores 
  • Extra weight will be given for required math and science courses completed with a grade of B or higher 
  • Extra weight will be given for any higher education degree earned previously 

To learn more about Pellissippi State’s Nursing program, visit www.pstcc.edu/nursing. 

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Graduate spotlight: Victoria Williams finds community on Blount County Campus

Victoria Williams and her dad, Robert Williams
Victoria Williams, left, has followed in her father’s footsteps by completing her Nursing degree at Pellissippi State. Her father, Robert Williams, graduated from Pellissippi State’s Nursing program in 2017.

When Victoria Williams started studying to be a certified nursing assistant in high school, she inspired her dad, Robert, to enroll in Pellissippi State’s Nursing program. Robert graduated from Pellissippi State in 2017, the same year Victoria graduated from high school. Now, four years later, Victoria has also earned her A.A.S. in Nursing from Pellissippi State!  

During her first two years at Pellissippi State, Victoria was a tutor in the Academic Support Center on the College’s Blount County Campus, where she helped fellow students with their science classwork. My co-workers in the tutoring center became like family,” recalls Victoria. We would all help each other with our different subjects, since many of the other tutors were taking classes too. It’s like a little family in there.”   

Victoria also spent her time in college working at Village Behavioral Health Treatment Center, an adolescent health facility, where she will continue to work part time after graduation. She has accepted a full-time position at Peninsula Hospital in their child psych unit as wellVictoria plans to eventually get her Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner for children and adolescents. 

While Victoria has many fond memories from her time in college, she will always be especially grateful for the community she found at Pellissippi State. “The faculty and staff are just so active in the students’ lives, and they are there to help them,” shares Victoria. “Even during the pandemic, my teachers and classmates were all about having Zoom meetings and keeping that camaraderie between everybody. I felt like the community is very special at Pellissippi State. They put so much effort into making sure students don’t feel alone, even before and especially during the pandemic. 

Becoming a part of a community made Victoria’s experience special and she encourages everyone to jump right into that community. “Pellissippi State is different from high school,” she says. “When you go to Pellissippi State, you are doing school in that community. You don’t just go to school, hang out with friends and then go home. Your friends are at school, and you do your homework at what feels like a home. You build into this community and you become a part of it. Dive in, get involved and be a part of that community!”

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Pellissippi State hosts Remake Learning Day on May 22 with DENSO, ORNL, more

Brian Davis of Danny Davis Electric, right, shows students how to run electrical wire at Pellissippi State's Blount County Campus
Brian Davis, right, of Danny Davis Electric shows students how to run electrical wire at Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus during a spring break exploration camp in 2021. The Blount County Campus will host a free Remake Learning Day on May 22 for children and their parents to explore career readiness, science, technology and construction.

After a challenging year for education, Remake Learning Days Across America returns this spring in more than 17 regions, with family-friendly learning events designed to engage caregivers, parents and children around the country.  

Remake Learning Day in Blount County will take place 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, May 22, at Pellissippi State Community College’s Blount County Campus2731 W. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Friendsville.

This free, in-person event is designed for parents and caregivers to learn alongside their kids and offer relevant and engaging educational experiences for youth (pre-K through high school).  Remake Learning Day is an interactive fair designed to help develop kids’ sense of creativity and curiosity.

This year’s event highlights the learning themes of career readiness, science, technology and construction. Some of the local businesses and organizations involved include DENSO, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Home Depot and Pellissippi State 

For more information, contact Joy McCamey at jlmccamey@pstcc.edu or visit https://remakelearningdays.org/knoxville 

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Remake Learning Days Across America is led by Remake Learning, a network that ignites engaging, relevant and equitable learning practices in support of young people navigating rapid social and technological change. National partners of RLDAA include PBS Kids, Digital Promise, Common Sense Media, Learning Heroes and Noggin. RLDAA is generously supported by The Grable Foundation, The Hewlett Foundation, Schmidt Futures and Carnegie Corporation of New York. Visit remakelearning.org for more information or follow RL on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. For more information specifically on Remake Learning Days Across America, visit remakelearningdays.org or follow RLDAA on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and the hashtag #RemakeDays. 

Pellissippi State welcomes walk-ups to vaccination clinic

Cars lined up at Pellissippi State's vaccination clinic on April 9
Drivers line up for their COVID-19 vaccinations at Pellissippi State’s drive-thru vaccination clinic on the college’s Blount County Campus on Friday, April 9. When the clinic reopens Friday, April 23, Pellissippi State will welcome those without an appointment starting at 1 p.m. each day the clinic is open, in an effort to not waste any leftover vaccine.

Pellissippi State Community College will welcome those without appointments to its drive-thru vaccination clinic starting at 1 p.m. each day the clinic is open. 

Pellissippi State’s vaccination clinic will be held 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays on the college’s Blount County Campus, 2731 W. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Friendsville. The clinic is administering the Moderna vaccine starting Friday, April 23. 

While Pellissippi State encourages you to sign up for an appointment herethose without appointments are welcome to drop by the vaccination clinic at 1 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays to receive a shot if vaccine is available. The college is committed to not letting any open vials of vaccine go to waste.  

Vaccinations are free, and you must be 18 years old to receive the Moderna vaccine. Those who register for appointments in advance only need to schedule your first dose of Moderna. Pellissippi State staff will schedule you for your second dose when you arrive for your vaccination. 

Second appointments will be set 28 days after the first vaccination is given. 

For more information about the college’s vaccination clinic, including forms Pellissippi State asks that you fill out and print in advance of your appointment, visit www.pstcc.edu/vaccine. 

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Pellissippi State to reopen vaccination clinic Friday, April 23

A young man receives a COVID-19 vaccine on Pellissippi State's Blount County Campus
A young man receives a COVID-19 vaccine on Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus on Friday, April 9, the first day the drive-thru vaccination clinic was open.

Pellissippi State Community College will reopen its drive-thru vaccination clinic on its Blount County Campus Friday, April 23, with the Moderna vaccine instead of Janssen/Johnson & Johnson. 

The clinic will be closed this weekend as the College prepares for the shift to a different vaccine. Those who had appointments scheduled for Friday, April 16, and Saturday, April 17, are being notified by Pellissippi State staff. 

Pellissippi State staff waited to cancel this weekend’s vaccination clinic appointments until after the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which provides guidance to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, met Wednesday afternoon to discuss data involving six reported U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in individuals after receiving the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine.  

The committee delayed a decision Wednesday, continuing the hold on the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine for at least 10 more days to allow further review. 

Because the Moderna vaccine requires two shots spaced four weeks apart, Pellissippi State is retooling its appointment software to allow for this changeFor more information about the College’s vaccination clinic, including a link to register when the software is updated, visit www.pstcc.edu/vaccine. 

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Pellissippi State pauses vaccination clinic while Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine on hold

Pellissippi State Community College is pausing operations at its Blount County Campus drive-thru vaccination clinic because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have recommended a hold on the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine for now. 

College staff will be contacting those who have made appointments to receive their vaccinations this Friday and Saturday. 

Pellissippi State is in contact with the Tennessee Department of Health and is awaiting further guidance as the CDC and FDA review data involving six reported U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in individuals after receiving the J&J vaccine. 

In the meantime, College staff is exploring alternate solutions to moving forward with operating the drive-thru vaccination clinic that opened April 9. Pellissippi State vaccinated 190 individuals on Friday and 179 on Saturday. 

Pellissippi State hosts vaccination clinic on Blount County Campus

Drivers should enter and exit Pellissippi State's Blount County Campus via South Old Grey Ridge Road for their COVID-19 vaccinations.
This map shows how those who make appointments to receive a COVID-19 vaccine at Pellissippi State Community College will enter and exit the Blount County Campus via S. Old Grey Ridge Road.

Pellissippi State Community College is excited to announce that the college’s Blount County Campus will host a COVID-19 vaccination clinic for the community starting April 9. 

The clinic will be open for appointments 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays until the end of July, with the possibility of adding Tuesdays as well after spring 2021 classes end in May.  

Pellissippi State will offer the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which is one dose only. There is no charge for the vaccine, but you must be 18 years old to receive this vaccine.  

Visit www.pstcc.edu/vaccine to make an appointment to receive the vaccine at Pellissippi StateTo speed up your appointment, please fill out and print the screening form in advance. Paper copies also will be available onsite 

Your total time on campus will be around 30 minutes to allow for check-in, vaccination administration and a 15-minute observation time following the shot. Please arrive as close to your appointment time as possible to help keep wait times to a minimum. 

Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus is located at 2731 W. Alexander Parkway, Friendsville. For more information, including a map of how the clinic will be set up in the campus’ parking lot, visit www.pstcc.edu/vaccine. 

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Pellissippi State breaks ground for long-awaited workforce development center in Blount County

Eight officials with shovels in front of a bulldozer
Among the dignitaries celebrating the groundbreaking for the Ruth and Steve West Workforce Development Center are, from left, state Rep. Jerome Moon, donors Steve and Ruth West, Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr., Tennessee College of Applied Technology Knoxville President Kelli Chaney, state Sen. Art Swann, state Rep. Bob Ramsey and Blount Partnership CEO Bryan Daniels.

Pellissippi State Community College broke ground today on its new Ruth and Steve West Workforce Development Center, a joint project with Tennessee College of Applied Technology Knoxville. 

The 51,000-square-foot building on the College’s Blount County Campus will help fill the area’s need for highly skilled, college-educated employees. Blount County has experienced $2.8 million in new capital investment and announced 5,500 new jobs since 2011, according to the Blount Partnership. 

Named for longtime Blount County Campus benefactors Ruth and Steve West, the workforce development center will include space for Pellissippi State’s Computer Information Technology, Culinary Arts, Electrical Engineering Technology and Electromechanical Engineering programs while TCAT will have space for its Engineering Technology program, giving that college its first footprint in Blount County. 

Steve and Ruth West in front of artist rendering of new building named for him
Steve and Ruth West stand in front of an artist rendering of the Ruth and Steve West Workforce Development Center that is being built on Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus.

“I was on the Blount County Industrial Board for 20 years, and we brought a lot of diverse companies in and continue to do so,” said Mr. West, longtime owner of West Chevrolet and a former mayor of Maryville. “But it’s not like it was when I was young. A good attitude and willingness to learn, while important, are not enough in today’s economy. We need more specialized training to fill these jobs.” 

The center will help fill that gap, with a unique, integrated approach to workforce development. In addition to Pellissippi State’s partnership with TCAT, the workforce development center also represents a K-12 partnership, offering dual enrollment classes for high school students, focusing on high-demand career skills. Meanwhile, a new corporate training center will give the College’s local industry partners extra space and opportunity to train their employees at Pellissippi State. 

“Our institutional mission at Pellissippi State is to provide a transformative environment that fosters the academic, social, economic and cultural enrichment of individuals and of our community,” said Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr. “The Ruth and Steve West Workforce Development Center is going to embody that mission in a tangible way, helping us prepare Blount County students for high-demand careers that will sustain them and their families economically and allow them to stay right here at home instead of leaving in search of well-paying jobs. 

For example, the new building will include a 4,890-square-foot Culinary Institute that will allow the College to expand its Culinary Arts degree program and industry-recognized certification programs, increasing the number of graduates ready to fill in-demand culinary positions at hotels, restaurants, farmsteads, breweries, wineries and resorts across Blount, Knox and surrounding counties.

Dignitaries with shovels in front of bulldozer
Also celebrating the groundbreaking for the Ruth and Steve West Workforce Development Center today are, from left, Blount County Campus Dean Priscilla Duenkel, Blount County Mayor Ed Mitchell, Jeff Weida of Arconic Tennessee, Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr., TCAT President Kelli Chaney, Louisville Mayor Tom Bickers, Don Heinemann of Blount Memorial Hospital, Bob Booker of DENSO and Maryville Mayor Tom Taylor. Not pictured is Alcoa Mayor Clint Abbott.

The workforce development center will also help us serve our industry partners by providing  more space to train their employees and offering individuals the continuing education that helps them move to the next level in their careers,” said Teri Brahams, executive director of Economic and Workforce Development for Pellissippi State. And with the flexible space located right outside our new Culinary Institute, the College can provide the community space to host events and have them catered by our Culinary Arts students. It’s a win for everyone.” 

Construction of the $16.5 million building, which was funded by the state of Tennessee and TCAT in addition to Pellissippi State, is projected to be complete in February 2022.  

The fundraising team with shovels
Among those who have been working hard behind the scenes are fundraising team members Joy Bishop and Sharon Hannum, Chuck Griffin of BarberMcMurry Architects, Pellissippi State President L. Anthony Wise Jr., TCAT President Kelli Chaney, fundraising team members Christy Newman, Andy White and Mary Beth West, Raja Jubran of Denark Construction and fundraising team member Teri Brahams, from left.

The Pellissippi State Foundation raised $5.5 million for the workforce development center. In addition to the Wests, the center also received significant financial contributions from donors such as the Economic Development Board of Blount County Government, the City of Maryville and the City of Alcoa; Arconic Foundation; Blackberry Farm Foundation; Blount Memorial HospitalCare Institute GroupClayton Family Foundation; Clayton Homes Inc.; DENSO North America Foundation; and William Ed Harmon.  

For more information on Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400. 

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Pellissippi State partners with Blount Memorial to train nurses for Covid-19 care

Blount Memorial nurses run a simulation in the Nursing lab on Pellissippi State's Blount County Campus
Blount Memorial Hospital nurses run a Covid-19 simulation in the Nursing lab on Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus on June 3. Each group of medical-surgical nurses is led by an ICU-surgical nurse. BMH Critical Care Educator Briana Dahl, at head of SimMan, is the team lead for this group of nurses.

Pellissippi State Community College is helping Blount Memorial Hospital nurses train to care for Covid-19 patients. 

The partnership allows the Maryville hospital’s nurses to train in the Nursing simulation lab on the college’s Blount County Campus. The first training was held Wednesday, May 27. 

“We have gotten together with Briana Dahl, the critical care educator for Blount Memorial, to create simulation scenarios based on actual cases to better prepare these nurses for what can come up in the hospital,” said Assistant Professor Ronda McCown, who is the lab coordinator for Pellissippi State Nursing. “A simulation lab is a safe place to learn because no one can get hurt.” 

For Blount Memorial’s critical care nurses, the simulations will be a review. But for the hospital’s medical-surgical nurses, the single largest nursing specialty in the United States, the simulations will allow them to practice skills they may not had to use since they were in Nursing school. 

“Learning is often experiential,” said Michelle McPhersondirector of education for Blount Memorial. “This training enables us to run scenarios that maybe they’ve only come across once or twice in their career.” 

As Pellissippi State continues to follow guidelines for social distancing, only seven people are allowed in the lab at one time: one ICU-surgical nurse and four medical-surgical nurses, as well as Katrenia Hill, nursing skills and simulation laboratories coordinator for Pellissippi State, and Pellissippi State Nursing Instructor Anna Wells. 

“We purposely mixed the floor staff who aren’t used to dealing with ventilators and Covid-19 with our critical care unit nurses, who can serve as team leads,” McPherson explained, adding there is ample time between the 2.5-hour training sessions for a “very strict cleaning regimen. 

BMH Critical Care Educator Briana Dahl is flanked by Pellissippi State Nursing staff in the Blount County Campus' Nursing lab
Pellissippi State Nursing Instructor Anna Wells, left, and Katrenia Hill, nursing skills and simulation laboratories coordinator for Pellissippi State, right, join Blount Memorial Hospital Critical Care Educator Briana Dahl in Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus Nursing lab to train BMH nurses on Covid-19 care.

By the time the training ends, 61 Blount Memorial medical-surgical nurses will have more experience in intubation careputting patients on a ventilator, adjusting ventilator settings, suctioning and proning” patients, which means lying them flat on their chests. 

The trainings will culminate in a mock code that allows nurses to practice what to do when a patient is declining, McCown noted. 

These Covid-19 trainings, which are expected to wrap up June 17, are just the beginning of what Pellissippi State and Blount Memorial nursing staffs envision being a year-round partnership. 

“We are trying to start up a nurse residency program that would meet once a month for one year,” McPherson said. “These four-hour sessions would allow us time to address things new nurses may need help with, such as mock codes and leadership training. 

This conversation with Pellissippi State actually started last fall, noted Joseph Newsomeassistant chief nursing officer for Blount Memorial – before Covid-19 pushed that training to the forefront. 

“When Mr. Newsome and I met last fall and he toured our Blount County Campus, we started discussing all of the possibilities for a training partnership between the college and the hospital,” said Dean of Nursing Angela Lunsford. “Blount Memorial provides several clinical training areas for our Nursing program, and it is our hope that using the simulation lab at Pellissippi State will strengthen training for nursing students, new graduate nurses and experienced ones.” 

Blount Memorial Hospital nurses train on Covid-19 care at Pellissippi State
Blount Memorial Hospital nurses Kenlie Langford, left, and Kody Smitherman, right, train on Covid-19 care on Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus on June 3. The nurses do not have to maintain social distancing because of the personal protective equipment they are wearing.

Newsome agreed. 

We are excited to send our intern nurses and our new graduate nurses to Pellissippi State’s Blount County Campus to use the simulation lab to enhance their training,” he said. “I think the Covid-19 trainings and the new nurse residency program show the best of what we can do when we work together.” 

For more information on Pellissippi State, visit www.pstcc.edu or call 865-694-6400.

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