Take a virtual music class with Pellissippi State’s lifelong learning program

Anna Uptain with musical instruments
Anna Uptain is teaching virtual classes in guitar, mandolin, ukulele and banjo this fall.

Pellissippi State Community College’s Business and Community Services is offering virtual music classes this fall. These noncredit classes are open to the public. 

In late March, when the college moved to remote instruction due to the coronavirus pandemic, several lifelong learning classes were impacted, shifting from in person to virtual meetingsNearly half of Pellissippi State’s lifelong learning classes this fall will continue to be offered virtually.  

“It was important for us to continue offering opportunities for the community to learn and connect,” said Nancy Corumprogram coordinator with Business and Community Services. “By going virtual with as many classes as possible, we’ve been able to help provide a small sense of normalcy and allow people to still experience that human connection during the last few months. We’ve had many instructors and students really welcome the new virtual environment. 

Anna Uptain is one of Pellissippi State’s lifelong learning instructors who has embraced the opportunity to teach virtually. While Uptain had taught virtual private lessons prior to this year, teaching group classes over the computer has been a new experience.  

Uptain is teaching six virtual classes this fall: 

  • Beginner Ukulele: Tuesdays, Sept. 8-Oct. 13 
  • Advanced Ukulele: Tuesdays, Oct. 20-Dec. 1 
  • Beginner Guitar: Thursdays, Oct. 22-Dec. 3 
  • Not Your Traditional Guitar: Thursdays, Sept. 10-Oct. 15 
  • Dueling Banjos: Wednesdays, Oct. 21-Dec. 2 
  • Quick Pickin’ Mandolin: Wednesdays, Sept. 9-Oct. 14 

“I like teaching virtually,” said Uptain, who has been teaching classes at Pellissippi State for almost 20 years. There’s no travel and you can be in the comfort of your own home. If you want to wear your lounge pants and t-shirt, you can.”  

Uptain‘s classes are designed to help people learn quickly. Knowing time is a luxury when juggling work and other responsibilities, her classes meet one night a week for six weeks. 

On the first night of every class, I introduce myself and I tell students, You will go home playing tonight. And they look at me like I’m joking,” Uptain said“My goal when I created the classes was to get people up and playing as quickly as possible and have success with it. 

The key to taking a virtual class, Uptain said, is to come into the class with an excitement and willingness to learn.  

“Don’t be afraid of the computer. One of the nicest things about virtual classes is there’s nobody else there to hear you if you mess up,” she said. “Everyone is starting in the same place.  

Uptain’s classes are open to ages 13 and older. You do not need to know how to read music or have any musical background or experience. 

Other lifelong learning classes being offered virtually this fall include: 

  • Dulcimer 
  • Digital Photography 
  • Book Writing 
  • Health & Wellness 
  • For the Love of Gems & Jewelry with JTV 
  • Professional development classes, like Solidworks, FANUC, leadership 

Lifelong learning classes that are being taught in person are following new safety precautions in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Masks or face coverings must be worn by all instructors and students, and classes also are being held in larger classrooms to ensure that participants can maintain 6 feet of distance between each other. 

Registration for fall classes is open now. To register for a virtual music class or any other Pellissippi State lifelong learning class this fall, contact the Business and Community Services office at 865.539.7167 or visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs. 

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Pellissippi State graduate teaches new Welding for Artists class this summer

Liz Headrick welds an artwork
Liz Headrick, owner of Fabuliz Fabrication and Welding, will teach a one-day Welding for Artists noncredit course twice this month at Pellissippi State Community College.

Pellissippi State Business and Community Services is offering a new Welding for Artists class this summer, taught by a graduate who used her Welding Technology degree to start a creative business. 

Liz Headrick, Class of 2017, is teaching the noncredit Welding for Artists twice this summer: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, July 18, and Saturday, July 25, at Pellissippi State’s Strawberry Plains Campus, 7201 Strawberry Plains Pike, Knoxville. 

As a lifelong learning class, Welding for Artists iopen to the public, though some welding knowledge and beginner experience is recommended. The cost is $89. 

“I hope people taking the class will get a cool experience and the opportunity to create something they never would have thought about previously or never had the equipment to make,” Headrick said. “Everyone will get to create a one-of-a-kind piece they can take home and show off.” 

Headrick discovered her interest in welding at just the right time. Shortly after taking a welding class at a community college in California, Headrick moved to Knoxville and enrolled in the newly formed Welding Technology program at Pellissippi State. 

“My husband bought me a welder as a graduation present,” Headrick noted. “At first, I didn’t have anything that needed welding, so I just took random nuts and bolts lying around the garage as an excuse to do something with it, and it stuck.” 

When Headrick began posting photos of her work on Facebook and Instagram three years ago, people started to reach out to her, wanting her to make custom pieces for them. That’s when Headrick’s businessFabuliz Fabrication and Welding, took off. 

“It’s almost to the point now where my full-time job gets in the way of being at home making creative pieces,” she joked. 

Artwork by Liz Headrick
Pellissippi State Welding Technology graduate Liz Headrick makes art from repurposed materials.

Using recycled scrap metal has always been a part of Headrick’s work. She repurposes materials — nuts and bolts, old saw blades, chains, spark plugs and more — to create one-of-a-kind metal art and décor. 

“I like finding materials that people were throwing away or are considered as junk and using those materials to make something interesting or something you wouldn’t have thought to use it for,” Headrick said. “People throw away so much! I’m able to find a lot of materials from yard sales and eBay.” 

To register for Welding for Artists or any other Pellissippi State lifelong learning classes this summer, contact the Business and Community Services office at 865.539.7167 or visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs 

Lifelong learning classes are following new safety precautions in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Masks or face coverings must be worn by all instructors and students for the duration of the class. Classes also are being held in larger classrooms to ensure that participants can maintain 6 feet of distance between each other. 

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Pellissippi State moves online for rest of semester, postpones commencement

Pellissippi State sign at entrance to Hardin Valley Campus
Pellissippi State is moving its classes and student services online for the remainder of the spring semester.

President L. Anthony Wise Jr. announced Thursday that it is in the best interest of Pellissippi State Community College faculty, staff and students to move classes and student services online for the remainder of the spring semester, with very few exceptions. 

This serious decision was made after the White House and the Centers for Disease Control revised their guidance that social gatherings should be limited to 10 or fewer people, a challenge for any institution. 

To that end, all college events through May 11 have been canceled, effective immediately. Spring commencement and the Nursing pinning ceremony, originally planned for May 10, will be postponed until a later date, but will be held in person when it is safe to do so. 

We know this is not the semester you imagined. It is not the semester we imagined. But we will get through this together,” Wise said in an email to faculty, staff and students. “We have a dedicated group of employees working every day to ensure we cover all our bases so we can finish the semester Pellissippi Strong. This includes everything from offering advising and tutoring online or by phone to making sure our work-study students and part-time employees get paid, even if their jobs change to duties they can do remotely. 

Although classes are moving to an online format for the rest of the semester, at least one computer lab on each campus will continue to operate its normal hours. However, there will be a reservation system put in place after the college’s extended spring break ends March 29 to ensure that there are no more than 10 people in a lab at one time. The same is true for classes that need to hold labs on campus to complete the semester. Instructors may meet with nine or fewer students in a lab while practicing social distancing measures of leaving at least 6 feet between individuals. 

As Pellissippi State transitions to an online learning environment, students can submit questions and concerns about technology, coursework, and support services to our new PantherHelp team at this link. Pellissippi State will continue to update its website – www.pstcc.edu/coronavirus – with frequently asked questions, as well as new pages of resources for faculty, staff and students.  The college also will communicate with faculty, staff and students via their Pellissippi State email and Pellissippi State’s social media accounts. 

Meanwhile, Pellissippi State’s Business and Community Services has suspended all non-credit classes until further notice as well and is working with those instructors to discuss rescheduling options. Those with questions about non-credit classes should call 865.539.7167 or email bcs@pstcc.edu. 

“Although these are challenging circumstances, I look forward to the day when we can gather in community on campus once again,” Wise said. 

View Wise’s video message to faculty, staff and students today at www.pstcc.edu 

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Improve your health and social life in the New Year with ballroom dancing

Couple ballroom dancing
Ballroom dancing can help you keep your New Year’s resolutions to be more active and get your exercise in 2020.

If living a more active lifestyle is one of your New Year’s resolutions, ballroom dancing classes offered by Pellissippi State Community College Business and Community Services can help you meet your goals.

Ballroom dance is a social dance that focuses on partnership and has gained popularity in recent years with the rise of competitive television shows like “Dancing with the Stars.” In the seven-week Ballroom Dancing, Level 1 class offered by Pellissippi State in partnership with Dance Tonight, dancers will learn six core dances: waltz, tango, foxtrot, rumba, cha-cha and swing.

“There are so many reasons to take ballroom dancing,” said Kris Hazard, professional dance instructor and choreographer at Dance Tonight. “It gets you out of the house, and it’s a great way to meet people. Social dancers are friendly. They want more people to dance with, so it’s an easy crowd to get to know people in.

“Exercise is another one,” he continued. “Ballroom dancing is great if you want to be active and retain your mobility. It’s a low impact activity. We’re always sliding our feet on the floor, so you’re using your legs, but not getting the hard impact.”

Ballroom dancing is designed to help you communicate with a partner to move as one with the music, but participants are encouraged to sign up with or without a partner, as there are opportunities to meet and dance with others during the class.

The hardest step for most people is signing up for the class and coming through the door, Hazard noted.

“It’s a big step they took coming because they’re nervous about it, and now I have the responsibility to make them comfortable,” he said. “I want to push them so that they learn something and learn it correctly, but that also makes them comfortable and more confident with their dancing.”

Getting ready to perform on a stage is not the goal of the beginner class, Hazard stressed.

“We’re learning so you can get out on the dance floor, look comfortable and have a good time,” he said.

Students in Ballroom Dancing, Level 1 will have an opportunity to practice their moves outside of the class, if they choose, at Dance Tonight’s dance parties on Friday nights. Dancers and instructors from all of Dance Tonight’s classes are invited to attend the weekly parties.

“Practicing and dancing around others makes such a difference for the dancer’s learning and enthusiasm,” Hazard noted. “They get to use what they’ve learned in class!”

Ballroom Dancing, Level 1 begins Jan. 27 and will be held 6:45-7:30 p.m. Mondays through March 9, at Dance Tonight, 9119 Executive Park Drive, Knoxville, off the Cedar Bluff exit. Cost is $85 for an individual or $100 per couple.

To register for Ballroom Dancing, Level 1, or any other Pellissippi State lifelong learning classes this spring, contact the Business and Community Services office at 865.539.7167 or visit www.pstcc.edu/bcs.

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